Highlands

Clynelish Distillery

This distillery is located on the A9 at the popular coastal holiday town of Brora, Sutherland, around one hour north of Inverness. With beautiful views of the North Sea and the hills to the north – where the Clynemilton burn runs over seams of gold in the rock. With this water, Clynelish distillery produces a fruity, waxy, slightly smoky single malt.

While in Sutherland, learn about the history of the Highland Clearances at the nearby Timespan Museum in Helmsdale; or visit the beautiful Dunrobin Castle, home to the Clan Sutherland and the home of the first Duke of Sutherland, who built Clynelish Distillery.

Sutherland is also a haven for golfers, with the world famous links courses of Brora, Royal Dornoch, Tain and Golspie. Brora Golf Course looks across to the distillery, so why not visit for a dram after a round of golf.

Clynelish Distillery is a perfect stop for those going on to John O’ Groats or Orkney from Inverness, being almost exactly halfway. Come in for a tour or a dram of Sutherland’s only single malt whisky.

Glen Garioch

One of the oldest operating distilleries in Scotland – and its most easterly – Glen Garioch (pronounced Geery in the ancient Doric dialect still spoken in these parts) has been making its mighty malt in the quaint and historic market town of Oldmeldrum, near Aberdeen in North East Scotland, ever since 1797. Shielded from the world’s prying eyes, deep in the fertile ‘Granary of Aberdeenshire’, and only ever produced in small, precious batches, Glen Garioch is a rare find indeed, but warmly appreciated by those who like a hearty Highland malt, non chill-filtered as nature intended, with a wholesome maltiness, honeyed sweetness and delicious creamy texture to savour.

http://www.glengarioch.com/

Glencadam

This distillery first opened in 1825, in the ancient city of Brechin. This was the year that the first horse-drawn omnibuses were established in London, the world’s first modern railway opened, with the first public train pulled by steam engine, Cox’s Orange Pippin apples were first grown and London became the largest city in the world, over-taking Beijing. It was little more than one year after the Excise Act of 1823 legalised distilling.

Glencadam is now the only distillery in the county of Angus, an area of the Highlands region of Scotland. The first owner was a “Mr Cooper”, who sold the distillery in 1827. The name “Glencadam” comes from the area known as “The Tenements of Caldhame”. These were plots of ground given to the burghs of Brechin for food production. They were situated to the north and south east of the Den Burn where the distillery stands.

The distillery was owned by a David Scott and his descendants from 1827- 1891, and during this period it was rented to various distillers. Over the next few decades the distillery had a succession of owners.

Glencadam mothballed during both world wars. The warehouses were instead used to barrack soldiers. There is still a mark on the grass by No. 2 warehouse where their commissary was. Glencadam was bought in the 1950s by Hiram Walker, which subsequently became Allied Domeq, who closed the distillery in 2000.

Glencadam Single Malt has always been premium whisky for blending, and as such was highly sought after for some of the world’s most prestigious blends. Glencadam was finally bought by Angus Dundee Distillers on 1st June 2003, an independent Scottish company. Angus Dundee restarted production immediately, and we released our first ever single malt product, Glencadam Single Malt Scotch Whisky Aged 15 Years, in December 2005. This was subsequently re-launched in November 2009 with new packaging, alongside the release of a 10 year old expression.

http://www.glencadamwhisky.com/

Oban

Nestling beneath the steep cliff that overlooks Oban, one of Scotland’s oldest sources of single malt scotch whisky is but a stone’s throw from the sea. Take a tour of the senses at Oban Distillery! You will be taken around the distillery by one of our knowledgeable guides exploring each part of the whisky making process. Your tour will finish with a sample of our Oban 14 year old single malt with some crystalised ginger – a taste sensation! To round off nicely you will be given a small momento to remind you of your visit to Oban Distillery.

Oban Distillery is situated on the West Coast of Scotland, and produces Oban 14 year old West Highland Malt whisky, one of the Classic Malts Selection. A warm welcome awaits with guided distillery tours running regularly through out the year, an excellent exhibition and well stocked tasting bar and whisky gift shop.

The Distillery unusually sits right in the heart of the town of Oban, capital of North Argyll and ‘Gateway to the Isles’ with Caledonian MacBrayne ferries sailing to Lismore, Colonsay, Islay, Coll, Tiree, Mull, and Barra. Oban is easy to access whether travelling by car on the A85, arriving by bus or train from Glasgow, or flying into Oban Airport, North Connel There’s plenty to see and do with McCaigs Tower standing majestically above the town. Down below a host of shops, and excellent pubs and restaurants offering locally produced beers and lovingly prepared local seafood. The popular Oban War and Peace Museum, The Oban Chocolate Company, The Corran Halls Theatre and newly refurbished Pheonix Cinema are all worth a visit as is Dunollie Castle, seat of the Clan MacDougall on the outskirts of the town.

Slightly further afield is The Scottish Sealife Santuary, Oban, Dunstaffanage Castle, Inverawe Smokehouse and Bonawe Iron Furnace at Taynuilt, Cruachen The Hollow Mountain, at Loch Awe and Inverary Jail and Inverary Castle.

For the more adventurous there are a host of outdoor activities, with some of the best sailing and diving in the world. Canoeing, kayaking, and coasteering allow you to get up close to the local marine life whilst golf, cycling, hill walking, climbing and fishing will enable you to enjoy a host of Scottish Wildlife.

Oban regulary hosts the Royal National Mod and every August welcomes visitors to Oban Highland Games known locally as the Argyllshire Gathering. During the winter the town runs The Oban Winter Festival with a wide variety of activities.

There is an extensive range of accommodation on offer from local hotels and B&B’s , self catering, campsites and caravan parks and the local Youth Hostel and for those looking for the ultimate luxury experience the Hebridean Princess.

http://www.discovering-distilleries.com/oban/

Old Pulteney

The Old Pulteney distillery in Wick is one of the most northerly distilleries on the Scottish mainland. It is a windswept location, where the uncompromising landscape of the Highlands meets the North Sea, and the waves crash against the granite walls of the harbour.

The extreme location and unique stills have resulted in a distinctive flavour, bursting with the power and subtlety of the sea. Old Pulteney is the embodiment of history, people and place: It is the Genuine Maritime Malt.

Founded in 1826 by James Henderson at the height of Wick’s celebrated herring boom, the Pulteney Distillery is one of the most northerly on the British mainland.

At a time when road links to the town were yet to be established, the distillery was dependent on the sea for its supply of barley and for the shipping out of its malt whisky. Wick became known for the barrels of silver (herring) and gold (whisky) which left the port in vast numbers.

The distillery itself has an absorbing history, with its unique stills defying convention to this day. The wash still, in particular, is a source of fascination to visitors due to the absence of a ‘swan neck’. Legend has it that when the still was delivered it was too tall for the still house and the manager simply decided to cut the top off! The Old Pulteney bottle now incorporates a bulbous neck to reflect the shape of the stills.

Over time, the distillery has passed through the hands of various owners, and even closed during times of trouble for the industry in 1930. Luckily, the repeal of an often forgotten period of prohibition in 1947 saw the welcome resumption of whisky production, with the distillery changing ownership a number of times, before its purchase by Inver House Distillers in 1995. Throughout this history what has endured is the quality of the whisky. Traditional craftsmanship and the distillery’s windswept location continue to contribute to the award-winning whisky that is Old Pulteney Single Malt Scotch Whisky

http://www.oldpulteney.com/

BALBAIR

Balblair Distillery is a Scotch whisky distillery located in Edderton, Ross-shire, Scotland.

Originally founded in 1790, the distillery was rebuilt in 1895 by the designer Charles C Doig to be closer to the Edderton Railway Station on the Inverness and Ross-shire Railway line. However, so good was the original water source that the rebuilt distillery chose to ignore a nearby burn in favour of the original Ault Dearg burn. To this day, the Balblair Distillery continues to use this original water source.

John Ross, the founder, ran Balblair as a thriving business and in 1824 he was joined by his son, Andrew. The distillery stayed in the Ross family until 1894 when the tenancy was taken over by Alexander Cowan. In 1948 the freehold was bought by Robert Cumming, who promptly expanded the distillery and increased production. Cumming ran the distillery until he retired in 1970 when he sold it to Hiram Walker. In 1996 Balblair Distillery was purchased by Inver House Distillers Limited.

Balblair has one of the oldest archives in distilling, with the first ledger entry dated 25 January 1800. John Ross himself penned that first entry, which read: “Sale to David Kirkcaldy at Ardmore, one gallon of whisky at £1.8.0d”.

Balblair Single Malt whisky is bottled in four vintages – 2000, 1997, 1989 and 1979 – with the design inspired by the nearby Pictish stone Clach Biorach, which is thought to be 4000 years old. The 1989 vintage won a Gold Medal and was judged “best in class” in the 2007 International Wine & Spirits Competition, and was recommended by Ian Buxton in 101 Whiskies to Try Before You Die.

The distillery is now owned by Inver House Distillers Limited, whose other distilleries include the Speyburn-Glenlivet Distillery, Knockdhu Distillery, Old Pulteney Distillery and Balmenach Distillery

http://www.balblair.com/distillery

DALMORE

The Dalmore Distillery has been producing exceptional single malt whisky since 1839 and, for almost a century, was owned by the Clan Mackenzie. The clan’s defining influence on the distillery is still evident to this day, with the iconic royal stag’s antlers – taken from the Mackenzie family crest – adorning each and every bottle of The Dalmore.

Located on the northern shores of the Firth of Cromarty, deep in the spectacular Scottish Highlands, the distillery is perfectly placed to take advantage of a feast of natural resources: from the waters of Loch Morie, found high in the hills overlooking the distillery, to the golden barley of the rich coastal soils of the Black Isle. Being sited at sea level is critically important. Enveloped by the salt air, the sea-facing traditional dunnage warehouses provide the ideal conditions for maturation.

http://www.thedalmore.com/home.aspx