Ireland

Jameson

Blended Irish whiskey produced by the Irish Distillers subsidiary of Pernod Ricard.

The company was established in 1780 when John Jameson established the Bow Street Distillery in Dublin. Jameson was Scottish, a lawyer from Alloa who had married Margaret Haig, a sister of the brothers who founded the main Haig firms, and related to the Steins, a Scottish distilling family with interests in Dublin. Portraits of John and Margaret Jameson by Sir Henry Raeburn are in the collection of the National Gallery of Ireland.

Originally one of the six main Dublin Whiskeys, Jameson is now distilled in Cork. In 2013, annual sales topped 4.7 million cases (56.4 million bottles). Jameson is by far the best selling Irish whiskey in the world, as it has been sold internationally since the early 19th century. The United States is the largest market for Jameson Whiskey, with consumption during 2013 up by 12%

Historical pot still at the Jameson distillery in Cork

When John Jameson, a Scottish businessman, acquired the Bow Street Distillery in 1780, it was producing about 30,000 gallons annually. By the turn of the 19th century, it was the second largest producer in Ireland and one of the largest in the world, producing 1,000,000 gallons annually. Dublin at the time was the centre of world whiskey production. It was the second most popular spirit in the world after rum and internationally Jameson had by 1805 become the world’s number one whiskey. Today, Jameson is the world’s third largest single-distillery whiskey.

Historical events, for a time, set the company back. The temperance movement in Ireland had an enormous impact domestically but the two key events that affected Jameson were the Irish War of Independence and subsequent trade war with the British which denied Jameson the export markets of the Commonwealth, and shortly thereafter, the introduction of prohibition in the United States. While Scottish brands could easily slip across the Canadian border, Jameson was excluded from its biggest market for many years.

The introduction of column stills by the Scottish blenders in the mid-19th-century enabled increased production that the Irish, still making single pot still whiskey, could not compete with. There was a legal enquiry somewhere in 1908 to deal with the trade definition of whiskey. The Scottish producers won within some jurisdictions, and blends became recognised in the law of that jurisdiction as whiskey. The Irish in general, and Jameson in particular, continued with the traditional pot still production process for many years.

In 1966 John Jameson merged with Cork Distillers and John Powers to form the Irish Distillers Group. The New Midleton Distillery built by Irish Distillers produces most of the Irish whiskey sold in Ireland. The new facility adjoins the old one, which is now a tourist attraction. The Jameson brand was then acquired by the French drinks conglomerate Pernod Ricard in 1988, when it bought Irish Distillers. The old Jameson Distillery now serves as a museum which offers a tour.

In 2008, The Local, an Irish pub in Minneapolis, sold 671 cases of Jameson (22 bottles a day). making it the largest server of Jameson’s in the world – a title it maintained for four consecutive years.

http://www.jamesonwhiskey.com/fr

REDBREAST

Redbreast is a brand of single pot still type Irish Whiskey. There are currently four expressions available; Redbreast 12 year, Redbreast 12 Cask Strength, Redbreast 15 and the newest addition, Redbreast 21. Redbreast comes in a green bottle, and the 12 year old is 40.0% ABV (80 proof) – whereas the 15 year old is at 46% ABV and is non-chill filtered. It is produced at the New Midleton Distillery by Irish Distillers, a subsidiary of Pernod Ricard. In 2010, the Redbreast 12-year variation was proclaimed Irish Whiskey of the Year by whiskey writer, Jim Murray, and was also nominated as #1 buy in John Hansell’s Buyer’s Guide, which gave it a rating score of 96 points.

Redbreast is one of the few single pot still whiskey brands produced today (along with Irish Distillers’ Green Spot), and is the only one with an age statement. Note that all single malts are also purely from a pot still, but single pot still whiskeys use partially unmalted barley, so they cannot be technically called a single malt. Also, single malt whiskeys were generally distilled twice, whereas single pot still whiskeys were generally distilled three times

http://www.singlepotstill.com/redbreast/verify

GREEN SPOT

Green Spot is a single pot still Irish whiskey, produced specifically for Mitchell & Son of Dublin, by Irish Distillers at the Midleton Distillery, Cork, Ireland. It is one of the only remaining bonded Irish whiskeys, and is currently the only brand specifically produced for and sold by an independent wine merchant in Ireland.

Green Spot was described by whiskey writer Jim Murray as “unquestionably one of the world’s great whiskeys.”[

Mitchell & Son wine merchants were established in 1805; however, it is uncertain exactly when Green Spot was first produced. It is known though, that by the 1920s Jameson’s Bow Street Distillery was supplying Mitchell & Son with at least 100 sherry hogsheads of pot still distilled whiskey per annum.

Half of the casks used had previously held oloroso and other darker sherries, while the other half had held lighter finos. This was to prevent the wine from overpowering the whiskey. The whiskey was allowed to mature in the casks for five years, before being vatted and allowed to blend and mature for a further five years. It was then bottled and sold as a ten-year-old.

The blend was originally known as “Pat whiskey”, and the labels carried the logo of a man on a green background.

The Mitchells sold a range of whiskeys under their ‘Spot’ brand name. This name originated from their practice of marking casks of different ages with a daub or spot of coloured paint. There was a Blue Spot, Red Spot and even a Yellow Spot, but Green Spot emerged as their most popular whiskey and is one of the few “whiskey bonder brands” to survive to modern day.

When Jameson moved production from Bow St. to Midleton, the make up of the whiskey altered for the first time in living memory. This, coupled with low stocks of maturing whiskey, led Mitchell & Son into an agreement with Irish Distillers whereby the whiskey would be matured by the distillery in their own casks, with Mitchell & Sons having sole rights to market, sell and develop the whiskey.

http://www.singlepotstill.com/spotwhiskey/verify